Asia’s New Wings Book by Clifton & Michelle Cottom

Book Description for :

Asia Cottom lived eleven short years on this earth. Her tragic death on Flight #77 on 9/11 is forever etched in the hearts of the countless people who loved her. But her wise and influential life, her positive attitude, and profound faith in God are her true legacy.

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You may love God with all your heart and soul, yet not understand what He is doing. In Asia’s New Wings, Clifton and Dr. Michelle Cottom, along with family and friends, walk beside you, sharing their thoughts and offering compassion to help you come to a place of acceptance, when trying to make sense of suffering great loss. The people in this book have learned to come to terms with what God allows, and are now in a place where they can help heal others. If you have gone—or are going through—the “valley of despair,” you will find comfort and empathy from those who care. You will also find hope and the strength to move forward as you rediscover your life.

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What Asia’s parents and all those who loved her went through, healed from, and learned will bring comfort and relief to those who travel down the road of loss. Reading and experiencing Asia’s story will truly bring healing and life to all who turn these pages.

I rated this book 5 *****’s

The most heart breaking book I ever read

I know from he title alone that this book is the most heart breaking book I will read. I was right. I was crying the first chapter already. It breaks my heart so badly. I cannot imagine Michelle and Clifton feelings when losing their precious baby girl Asia who lost her wings at age 11.

It was last month that my very first time to visit New York City, the top place that in on my bucket list. I took many pictures but Twin Towers are the most many photos I took. The building amazed me but the same time I was sad by looking at it. I know it has been 14 years but those parents, relatives, friends who lose their loved-ones in that horrific 9/11 their lives are forever changed.

Reading this book is very sad. At the same time, it gives you the healing for this family and other family as well who lost loved-ones during 9/11. I loved Asia’s name. It is a unique and beautiful name. Maybe because I am Asian. She is such a bubbly girl, smart and full of life. Reading her story is one of the sweetest true story book I ever read.

Though Asia is in heaven, her family never stop to amazed their church and community. It is also rewarding that the foundation in honor of her name, helped kids to strive and successful in their studies. This book is beyond beautiful to read. You do need a box of tissues, enjoy Asia’s spirit while you are reading. Time indeed heals heartaches.

Acceptance

One of the hardest things for all of us to understand is that we have little or no control over the tragedies of life.  We do not choose where, when or how they arrive.  Acceptance means facing reality, and when we face reality we sometimes discover things that are not pleasant or happy.  Albus Dumbledore from the Harry Potter series may have said it best:  “Understanding is the first step to acceptance and only with acceptance can there be recovery.”

Acceptance is key in the grieving process.  It allows us to move forward from tragic experiences and move into a different stage of the grief process.  However, although it is simple enough to talk about acceptance, it can be the hardest thing on earth to accomplish.

Here are some things I have learned about acceptance through my struggle with grief over Asia’s death:

  • Acceptance takes time.  No matter how much you might want to move forward, you still have to go through the grieving process and that time varies for everyone.  
  • Acceptance comes through small things.  I never really had one particular moment where I just accepted Asia’s death.  Instead, I gradually realized over time that the initial keen grief I felt was mellowing into something different.
  • Acceptance does not mean forgetting.  Some people may be afraid to accept a loved one’s death because they equate acceptance with forgetting that person or thinking that his or her life did not matter.  Nothing could be further from the truth!  True acceptance means that those memories hold cherished places in your heart while you move forward without the loved one.
  • Acceptance does not mean loss of pain.  It never stop hurting when you lose someone you care about, and even years after the loss an unexpected voice, sight or even smell can bring back the grief in a sudden and hurtful way.  However, acceptance means that the sharp grief is temporary, while the more mellow remembrance is permanent.

Losing Asia was the hardest thing I ever went through in my life.  However, with time, my paralyzing grief changed into a more manageable sorrow and eventually I was able to accept the loss and move forward.  You can do this, too; it simply takes time and an effort to move past the initial grief into the other stages of the grieving process.

Buy the book:   Amazon  ~  Barnes & Noble

Author’s Bio:

Clifton and Michelle Cottom live in Prince George’s County, Maryland and they have one son, Isiah. The Cottoms are the co-founders and executive board members of the Asia SiVon Cottom (ASC) Memorial Scholarship Fund.

Book Description for :

Asia Cottom lived eleven short years on this earth. Her tragic death on Flight #77 on 9/11 is forever etched in the hearts of the countless people who loved her. But her wise and influential life, her positive attitude, and profound faith in God are her true legacy.

You may love God with all your heart and soul, yet not understand what He is doing. In Asia’s New Wings, Clifton and Dr. Michelle Cottom, along with family and friends, walk beside you, sharing their thoughts and offering compassion to help you come to a place of acceptance, when trying to make sense of suffering great loss. The people in this book have learned to come to terms with what God allows, and are now in a place where they can help heal others. If you have gone—or are going through—the “valley of despair,” you will find comfort and empathy from those who care. You will also find hope and the strength to move forward as you rediscover your life.

What Asia’s parents and all those who loved her went through, healed from, and learned will bring comfort and relief to those who travel down the road of loss. Reading and experiencing Asia’s story will truly bring healing and life to all who turn these pages.

Buy the book: Amazon ~ Barnes & Noble

Clifton and Michelle Cottom live in Prince George’s County, Maryland and they have one son, Isiah. The Cottoms are the co-founders and executive board members of the Asia SiVon Cottom (ASC) Memorial Scholarship Fund.


Connect with the authors:   Website  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter

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Disclosure:

I received the book for free from iRead Book Tours in exchange of my honest opinions. I did not receive any compensation.

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4 thoughts on “Asia’s New Wings Book by Clifton & Michelle Cottom

  1. Elizabeth O.

    This sounds like a lovely novel that teaches people about life and moving on. I would very much love to read it.

    Reply

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